Tango Mango

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How do I print the recipe to try? The background printed is too dark to read the type.

Asked by
Anonymous

Unfortunately, I agree — if you try to print the page, it’s tough to read.

I suggest doing what I do. Highlight and copy all of the relevant text. Paste it in a Word document or Notepad and print. It only takes a minute and you’ll have a readable document.

It was a hot summer afternoon and for a reason I cannot remember, I was driving with our daughter through an old, wooded neighborhood I had never visited before. A directional sign for an estate sale caught our eye and we decided to investigate. We did a slow drive-by and saw that the sweet, timeworn house was an outdated fixer-upper, probably owned by someone who could no longer take care of it. We parked and went in.
We must have hit the sale on its first day, because the house was crammed with items. As much as I love the thrill of the hunt, I sometimes feel like a trespasser when I examine an elderly person’s former possessions – sifting through folded items displayed on the beds, looking through cabinets, passing by a card table filled with cheap Christmas ornaments. I can understand the need to sell old jewelry and vintage quilts for money, but when I see black and white family photos with price stickers on them it makes me sad. I wonder… did no living relative want them?
My daughter and I separated – she headed to the garage and I turned into the dining room. I found eight crystal goblets that were intriguing. Were they Champagne flutes? Parfait glasses? Wine glasses? They were inexpensive, so I decided to buy one to use as a vase.
We got home and I looked carefully at this single glass I had bought. The pattern on it was hand cut and the glass was almost paper thin. The size and shape felt right in my hand. All of the sudden I knew I had made a mistake. Why hadn‘t I bought all of them? I had pressing things to do, so I asked my daughter to drive back to see if the other seven were still there.
The women working the sale were upset when she approached with the remaining glasses in her hands. They could not believe they had priced them individually and wished they had sold them as a set. They apologized to her and said that if she had been there just thirty minutes earlier she would have been able to purchase them all. That’s when my daughter told them I had been the buyer of the missing one.
We still don’t know what they were designed to hold, but as it turns out, I have never used any of them as a vase.
Every single time I drink from one of these precious glasses I think of that story. Sixteen dollars bought eight crystal goblets, but the memory is priceless.

It was a hot summer afternoon and for a reason I cannot remember, I was driving with our daughter through an old, wooded neighborhood I had never visited before. A directional sign for an estate sale caught our eye and we decided to investigate. We did a slow drive-by and saw that the sweet, timeworn house was an outdated fixer-upper, probably owned by someone who could no longer take care of it. We parked and went in.

We must have hit the sale on its first day, because the house was crammed with items. As much as I love the thrill of the hunt, I sometimes feel like a trespasser when I examine an elderly person’s former possessions – sifting through folded items displayed on the beds, looking through cabinets, passing by a card table filled with cheap Christmas ornaments. I can understand the need to sell old jewelry and vintage quilts for money, but when I see black and white family photos with price stickers on them it makes me sad. I wonder… did no living relative want them?

My daughter and I separated – she headed to the garage and I turned into the dining room. I found eight crystal goblets that were intriguing. Were they Champagne flutes? Parfait glasses? Wine glasses? They were inexpensive, so I decided to buy one to use as a vase.

We got home and I looked carefully at this single glass I had bought. The pattern on it was hand cut and the glass was almost paper thin. The size and shape felt right in my hand. All of the sudden I knew I had made a mistake. Why hadn‘t I bought all of them? I had pressing things to do, so I asked my daughter to drive back to see if the other seven were still there.

The women working the sale were upset when she approached with the remaining glasses in her hands. They could not believe they had priced them individually and wished they had sold them as a set. They apologized to her and said that if she had been there just thirty minutes earlier she would have been able to purchase them all. That’s when my daughter told them I had been the buyer of the missing one.

We still don’t know what they were designed to hold, but as it turns out, I have never used any of them as a vase.

Every single time I drink from one of these precious glasses I think of that story. Sixteen dollars bought eight crystal goblets, but the memory is priceless.

Rural hardly describes it. “Remote” is a better word. It was so still and quiet the only thing we heard were some raindrops making their way to the ground and an occasional deer thrashing through the brush nearby. We were on gravel roads for miles and miles before we got to this point. I kept thinking it would be a bad place to have car trouble or need any kind of assistance.

Despite the fact that it was cloudy, it was serene and beautiful.

Above Dairy Creek, Northwest of Portland, Oregon.

No contest. The homemade version wins.

I usually set my bar pretty high when it comes to choosing the photographs I post here. Dozens end up on the cutting room floor before I settle on the right one. Not this morning. Today I wanted to show you the little breakfast sandwich maker we got months ago, and I wasn’t going to make more sandwiches than we could eat all for the sake of photography.

We could live without this little appliance, but we love it. After it has warmed up, you build your sandwich starting with half an English muffin at the bottom. Then you add Canadian bacon, or turkey (what we used here), or even cooked, crispy bacon. Top it with cheese. Close the inner lid and then crack an egg on its surface. Another English muffin half finishes it off. You close the lid and wait four or five minutes. Voilà! One delicious, scrumptious breakfast package, ready to head out the door with you.

You can make healthier versions by using just egg whites. You can add spinach leaves or substitute low-fat cheese. Sometimes I will toast two pieces of whole wheat bread and then use a large, round cookie cutter to cut circles out of the bread. It’s a lighter version than with the English muffin.

Alternatively, you can keep the English muffin, load it up with various cheeses and pepperoni and top it with an egg. ;-)  Your call.

Excuse me, but do you have any idea how those chick eggs were made, or at least what was used for the eyes and beak? Thank you!

Asked by
Anonymous

  • I peeled the hard-boiled eggs and then sliced the top off the narrow part of the egg. I then very carefully dug out the yolks using a small baby spoon, I mashed the yolks with the other deviled egg fillings and spooned the mixture back into the hollow eggs. A few of the eggs tore during the process, which was fine, because it gave me a little more yolk for the filling!

The eyes are tiny pieces of ripe olive and the beaks are cut from carrot slices.

Link to deviled egg chicks for Easter

Crispy, bacon-wrapped dates

Salty, sweet, crispy, crunchy. I’m a big fan of bacon (you know this if you’ve been a follower for a while) so it completely makes sense that I would fall in love with the unlikely pairing of bacon, cheese, and dates. They may not be the prettiest hors d’oeuvre on your buffet, but this bite-size nugget of goodness is one of the best appetizers I’ve ever made.

Last night we ate these with sliced apples, grapes, crispy seed and nut crackers with rosemary and a variety of cheeses. With a cold glass of wine, it was a perfect, casual dinner.

Ingredients:

  • 16 large dates, pitted
  • 32 almond slivers, toasted
  • Scant 1/4 cup mild goat cheese or blue cheese, depending on what you prefer or have on hand
  • 6 to 8 slices of thin-sliced bacon, either cut in half or in thirds crosswise

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400°. Cut a lengthwise slit in the dates. Stuff each one with a couple of slivered almonds and about 1/2 teaspoon of the goat cheese. Pinch the dates closed. Wrap each date securely in a piece of bacon and secure with a toothpick. Arrange the dates, seam side down, on a baking sheet. (At this point stuffed dates can be either baked or refrigerated for 1 day.)

Bake the stuffed dates for about 20 minutes, or until the bacon is browned and crisp, turning each date after 10 minutes. Serve the stuffed dates warm or at room temperature.